The value of aircraft components made using composite materials is estimated at over $200 billion. Boeing and Airbus, the two largest aerospace companies, expect the amount of composites used in their aircraft to increase. The percentage of the structure of large passenger aircraft made using composites is currently 30 to 45% although this is projected to increase to over 50% and possibly higher.

Imagine building an aircraft with passive fire protection through containment by providing materials that act as a "non-burning fire barrier".

The growth in the usage of composite is due to several factors, most notably: 

  •    Light weight
  •    High specific stiffness and specific strength
  •    Fatigue endurance
  •    Design flexibility
  •    Corrosion resistant
  •    Cost effectiveness

The Future Is Here...

There are many varieties of composite materials used in aircraft although the two most common are: 

Glass reinforced Phenolic composites that are used extensively in aircraft cabins. Phenolic composites account for 80 – 90% of the interior furnishings of a passenger aircraft. Phenolic composites are used as either a single skin laminate or as sandwich material that consists of thin/glass/Phenolic face plates over a Nomex honeycomb core. While flame resistant, Phenolics produce toxic smoke when burning.

Carbon reinforced epoxy composites are used in aircraft structures including fuselage, wing and tail fin components, control surfaces and doors. When composites are exposed to high temperatures (typically above 300 – 400ºC) the organic matrix decomposes with the release of heat, smoke, soot and toxic volatiles. The heat, smoke and gases released by burning composites and the degradation in structural integrity can quickly jeopardize the safety of the aircraft.

Our fireproof inorganic resin composite laminates are candidates to fill the needs of the next generation of the most demanding aviation applications.

"We can customize the formulation, through our unique system,  
We can control advancement to the ceramic state"

State of Current Market...

mARKET pOTENTIAL...

Aerospace Challenges ...

Our fireproof inorganic resin laminates are candidates to fill the needs of the next generation of the most demanding aviation applications. We can offer a solvent less, lightweight, self extinguishing, fireproof barrier as the key to containing smoke and fire enabling the passengers and crew sufficient escape time . Our unique resin is smokeless, non-toxic, fireproof and has the ability to enter and sustain itself in the “Red Heat Zone”.

We can meet the demand to reduce pollution, fuel efficiency and high performance with this advanced inorganic material.

The Next Generation in Aerospace Materials 

The FAA has set a goal for fire safety of eliminating burning cabin materials as a cause of death in aircraft accidents. The growing use of polymer composite materials in aircraft has the potential to increase the fire hazard due to the flammable nature of the organic matrix. In addition to flammability, aircraft manufacturers are concerned with weight, cost and process ability.

Phenolic composites account for 80-90% of the interior furnishings of a passenger aircraft. Phenolic composites are used as either a single skin laminate or as a sandwich material that consists of thin/glass/phenolic face plates over a Nomex honeycomb core. While flame resistant, Phenolics produce toxic smoke when burning. When composites are exposed to high temperatures typically 300-400 c) the organic matrix decomposes with the release of heat, smoke, soot, and toxic volatiles. The heat, smoke and gasses released by burning composites and the degradation in structural integrity can quickly jeopardize the safety of the aircraft.